Morning Report: Decent jobs report

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 3049 13.25
Oil (WTI) 54.82 0.64
10 year government bond yield 1.71%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.92%

 

Stocks are higher after a decent jobs report. Bonds and MBS are up small.

 

Jobs report data dump:

  • Payrolls up 128,000 versus 90,000 expected
  • Unemployment rate 6.3%
  • Manufacturing payrolls – 36,000
  • Labor force participation rate 63.3%
  • Average hourly earnings up 0.2% MOM / 3.0% YOY

Overall a pretty decent report. Payrolls were depressed by the GM strike (about 46,000 workers), however the labor force participation rate ticked up and the employment-population ratio was flat at 61%. The two month revision was up 95,000 as well – September payrolls were revised upward by 44,000 and the August number was revised upward by 51,000. So, if you add back the GM strikers, and take into account the revisions, August’s number becomes 219,000, September becomes 180,000, and October becomes 174,000. Certainly nothing that would indicate any sort of major slowdown in the US economy.

 

Pennymac reported good numbers last night, with originations increasing to $35 billion in the last quarter. This was up 44% from Q2 and almost double last year. As expected, they took a hit on MSR valuations as rates fell, but they got a lot of that back on their hedges. Good times abound in origination business.

 

TRI Pointe reported numbers that beat the street, however revenues declined, as did average sales prices. That said, margins are increasing which is good news for the building sector. The S&P Homebuilder ETF (XHB) is up 54% so far this year.

Advertisements

Morning Report: Strong ADP jobs report

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2963 25.25
Oil (WTI) 56.12 0.14
10 year government bond yield 1.53%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.7%

 

Stocks are up this morning after China and the US supposedly have scheduled an October meeting. Bonds and MBS are down on the risk-on trade.

 

We have quite a bit of strong data this morning, starting with the ADP jobs report, which came in at 195,000. This was much higher than the 149k the Street was looking for, and the 158k expected for tomorrow’s jobs report. This was the highest number in 4 months. Manufacturing added 8,000 jobs, so we aren’t seeing any sort of trade-driven pull-back in that sector. Construction added 6,000 jobs. Where are jobs shrinking? tech and mining.

 

ADP report

 

Challenger and Gray released their layoffs report, which backed up the ADP report of job cuts in tech. The layoff report is based on press releases, not actual job cuts. US employers announced 53,480 job cuts last month, of which 10,000 were due to trade war issues. That said, most of the job cuts were in retail. “Employers are beginning to feel the effects of the trade war and imposed tariffs by the U.S. and China. In fact, trade difficulties were cited as the reason for over 10,000 job cuts in August,” said Andrew Challenger, Vice President of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. “We are continuing to see investor concerns shaking confidence in the market, and employers appear to be cutting workers in response to a slowdown in demand for their products and services,” he added.

 

In other economic data, productivity in the second quarter was unchanged at 2.3% and unit labor costs were revised upward to 2.6%. The Street was expecting a downward revision in productivity. Hourly compensation was revised upward to a 4.9% increase. Initial jobless claims came in at 216k.

 

We had a slew of Fed-speak yesterday, with a wide range of opinions, from John Williams of the NY Fed avoiding the dovish bent versus St. Louis President James Bullard advocating for 50 basis points. FWIW, the market is virtually unanimous in its forecast of a 25 basis point cut at the September 17-18 meeting.

 

Despite falling rates and rising home prices, bidding wars for properties hit an 8 year low in August, according to Redfin. “Despite remaining near three-year lows, mortgage rates have failed to bring enough buyers to the market to rev up competition for homes this summer,” said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. “Recession fears have been enough to spook some would-be buyers from making the big financial commitment of a home purchase. But assuming a recession doesn’t arrive this fall or winter, consumers will likely adjust to the new ‘normal’ of continued volatility in the stock and global markets, and the people who need and want to make a move will take advantage of low mortgage rates. As a result, I still expect homebuying competition to pick back up in the new year.”

Morning Report: Mortgage jobs continue to fall

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2899 -48
Oil (WTI) 61.36 -0.58
10 year government bond yield 2.48%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.22%

 

Stocks are lower after Chinese stocks got rocked overnight. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

The Chinese stock market fell 6% overnight, perhaps on trade war fears. Trump tweeted about re-establishing Chinese tariffs next Friday, but Chinese media largely buried the story.

 

There isn’t much in the way of economic data this week aside from inflation data on Thursday and Friday. We do have a lot of Fed-speak though. The Fed has a communications issue, with the Fed Funds futures predicting a rate cut in 2019, while the debate internally seems to be between maintaining current policy and perhaps having to raise rates further. The Fed Funds futures are a bit of a mystery, given that economic data is nowhere close to recessionary. The consensus at the Fed seems to be wait and see, and aside from a few mentions of the Fed undershooting their inflation target, nobody seems to be pushing for rate cuts.

 

With Herman Cain and Steve Moore out of the picture, Donald Trump still has two seats to fill at the Fed. Former budget official Paul Winfree is being mentioned as a possible nominee.

 

The Spring selling season has not done much to increase mortgage banking jobs. In April, there were 318,000 people employed in the mortgage banking space, a drop of 4% from a year ago and a decline of 1% from the previous month. Separately, a shortage of construction labor is acting as a constraint on the homebuilding market. Much of the job decrease has been in the non-bank mortgage banking sector.

 

mortgage banking jobs

Morning Report: Blowout ADP jobs number

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2945.83 2.3
Eurostoxx index 390.26 -0.72
Oil (WTI) 63.37 -0.27
10 year government bond yield 2.50%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.18%

 

Stocks are higher as we await the FOMC decision. Bonds and MBS are up. Markets should be quiet this morning as most of Europe is closed for May Day.

 

Today’s Fed decision is set to be released at 2:00 pm. No changes in policy are expected and it should be a nonevent.

 

Pending Home Sales rose 3.8% in March, according to NAR. Activity increased pretty much everywhere except for the Northeast. Falling mortgage rates have helped boost activity and we are seeing a bit of an improvement in the inventory balance. Pending home sales reached a level of about 5 million, which is the same level as we saw in 2000. We have 50 million more people since then, which means there is a lot of pent-up demand.

 

The ADP jobs report came in at an increase of 275,000 jobs in April. This was well above the Street expectation of 180,000 for Friday’s jobs report. Professional and business services led the charge, and we also saw an increase in construction employment. The service sector added 223,000 jobs, the biggest increase in two years. With the Fed out of the way, 2019 could be better economically than people were thinking. Note that Trump is still jawboning the Fed to cut rates.

 

ADP report

 

Mortgage Applications fell for the fourth straight week, dropping 4.3%. Purchases fell 4% and refis fell 5%. “Mortgage rates were lower last week, with the 30-year fixed rate declining to 4.42 percent, as concerns over global growth, particularly in Germany, outweighed more positive domestic news on first quarter GDP growth and business investment,” said Joel Kan, MBA Associate Vice President of Economic and Industry Forecasting. “Applications to refinance and purchase a home both fell, but purchase activity still remained slightly above year ago levels. The drop in refinances were driven by fewer FHA and VA loan applications, which typically lag the movement of conventional loans.”

 

Freddie Mac bumped up its origination forecast for 2019 by 4% to $1.74 trillion as rates have fallen. They expect the 30 year fixed rate mortgage to be 4.3% at the end of the year, and home price appreciation to moderate to 3.5%.

Morning Report: Surprising payroll number

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2729.75 -20
Eurostoxx index 370.51 -3.3
Oil (WTI) 55.07 -1.53
10 year government bond yield 2.63%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.35%

 

Stocks are lower this morning after Chinese stocks fell 4.4% overnight. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

Jobs report data dump:

  • Payrolls up 20,000 (huge miss – Street was looking for 180k)
  • Unemployment rate 3.8%
  • Labor force participation rate 63.2%
  • Employment-Population Ratio 60.7%
  • Average hourly earnings up 3.4%

Surprisingly poor payroll number, and a bit of a suprise given the ADP number and all of the other numbers, which indicate strength. I suspect this will get revised upward next month. The average hourly earnings number is the highest in a decade, and probably is a better indicator of the health of the labor market than the payroll number. Still, the first indication of a labor slowdown will be a drop in hiring, so it bears watching.

 

Housing starts rose 1.23 million in January, which was a touch higher than the Street estimate. Building Permits rose 1.35 million, slightly above the 1.29 million estimate. January housing numbers are typically the nadir of the seasonal slowdown, so it is hard to read too much into them.

 

Labor productivity rose 1.9% in the fourth quarter as output increased 3.1% and hours worked increased 1.2%. Productivity is what allows non-inflationary growth and is the biggest input into higher standards of living. Unit Labor costs rose 2%.

 

Initial Jobless Claims fell to 223,000.

 

House Democrats have introduced legislation to prevent any sort of reform of the CFPB. Their big objection is the fact that Mick Mulvaney ended regulation by enforcement action, which was the practice of promulgating intentionally vague rules and then fining companies for violating them without saying what the rules exactly are. Since the government has unlimited resources and most companies don’t, they choose just to pay whatever the agency asks. Mulvaney also required the agency’s lawyers to conduct cost-benefit analyses for proposed regulations, which they also dislike. The bill has zero Republican sponsors, will go nowhere in the Senate, and is really nothing more than a messaging exercise.

 

Rising home prices means rising home equity. In the fourth quarter, homeowners saw their equity increase by 8.1%, or $678 billion, according to CoreLogic. The number of homes with negative equity rose to 2.2 million units, however the amount of the negative equity also fell. Louisiana, Connecticut, and Illinois have the highest percentage of homes with negative equity, while Washington, Oregon, and Utah have the smallest.

 

negative equity