Morning Report: Commodity prices falling

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2778 -30
Eurostoxx index 364.14 -1.6
Oil (WTI) 60.5 0.31
10 year government bond yield 3.19%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.98%

 

Stocks are lower this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

Markets are open today, however many people are taking the day off in observance of Veteran’s Day.

 

There won’t be much in the way of market-moving data this week (CPI on Wednesday and retail sales on Thursday are the only potential market movers), however we do have a lot of Fed-speak, with Jerome Powell speaking on Wednesday.

 

Inflation at the wholesale level was a little hotter than expected, rising 0.6% MOM and 2.9% YOY. Ex food and energy, it rose 0.5% / 2.8% and ex food, energy and trade services (the core rate) it rose 0.2% / 2.8%. Inflation using the PPI metric is higher than the Fed’s 2% target, but the PPI isn’t the measure they target. We will get inflation at the consumer level on Wednesday.

 

Consumer sentiment improved in the first reading of the November numbers, according to the University of Michigan sentiment survey.

 

Amazing statistic: 20% of China’s apartments are vacant. That works out to be 50 million apartments. One of the biggest symptoms of a bubble is oversupply, and a 20% vacancy rate would qualify. In the big cities, apartments are ridiculously expensive, trading for something like 40 – 50 times income. For reference, prices in the US topped out at just under 5 times income in 2006. Chinese economic statistics are heavily massaged by government, but there is no doubt that they have the sort of real estate bubbles that seem to occur after decades of rapid growth, similar to the US in the 20s and Japan in the 80s. Once their bubble bursts, China will try and export their way out of it, which will probably spark more trade tensions, but will also put downward pressure on inflation and interest rates globally. The US could go through another period of having its cake and eating it too – a period where they go through strong economic growth without inflation worries.

 

Speaking of inflation, oil has been getting shellacked over the past month, losing over 20% from mid-October. Part of this has been driven by the US allowing 8 companies to buy Iranian oil despite sanctions. OPEC is now entertaining production cuts, which has stabilized prices at least today.

 

Also note that lumber prices (which have been soaring due to Canadian tariffs) have now reversed and are heading lower. This should help lower new home construction costs, although the biggest bottleneck remains labor and affordable lots.

 

lumber

 

So, while we are seeing inflationary pressures building in the labor market, commodities are going the other way.

 

California passed a couple of housing affordability initiatives last week, which were mainly targeted to the Bay Area. Similar measures in Oregon and Florida also passed.

 

 

Morning Report: Gen X hit hardest by Great Recession

Vital Statistics:

Last Change
S&P futures 2733 19.7
Eurostoxx index 382.97 2.89
Oil (WTI) 74.32 0.2
10 Year Government Bond Yield 2.85%
30 Year fixed rate mortgage 4.54%

Stocks are higher this morning on rumors that the Trump Administration is dialing back its plans for tariffs on European autos. Bonds and MBS are flat.

The minutes from the June FOMC meeting are coming out at 2:00 pm today. Be careful locking around then since they could be market-moving.

The service economy continues to plow ahead, according to the ISM Non-Manufacturing Survey. Higher input prices, tariffs, and labor shortages are the biggest worries. Trucking shortgages are increasing prices, and that has the potential to push up inflation since it touches just about every business, at least indirectly.

The economy added 177,000 jobs last month according to the ADP Survey. This was a touch below street estimates. Note that ADP numbers have generally been higher than the government’s for the past several months. The Street is looking for 191,000 jobs in tomorrow’s payroll report. While the payroll number will be important, for the bond market, it will all come down to the average hourly earnings number.

Initial Jobless Claims ticked up to 231,000 last week. Separately, outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas noted there were 37,000 announced job cuts in May.

Tariffs on about $34 billion worth of Chinese exports are set to go into effect tomorrow. Beijing has announced it will retaliate with more tariffs the “instant it goes into effect.” Trade fears have been weighing on the stock market, and we are seeing some effects in commodity prices. Today’s minutes will probably discuss the issue at length. On one hand, this trade war is pushing up commodity prices, which is inflationary and should encourage the Fed to lean hawkish, at least at the margin. On the other hand, trade wars are an economic drag, which should encourage more dovishness. The Fed generally considers commodity inflation to be transitory, so on net trade wars should encourage dovishness, at least at the margin.

Oil prices have been a problem for while now, as WTI crude now trades close to $75 a barrel. Oil prices have been rising due to Venezuela issues and pressure on Europe to not buy Iranian oil. Trump tweeted that OPEC should increase production, which caused Saudi Arabia to announce it would increase output and Iran to announce that his pressure on them have added about $10 to the price of oil in the first place.  At the end of the day however these issues affect North Sea Brent prices, which really only matter to East Coast refineries. The rest of the country uses US domestic oil. Higher gas prices do make consumers surly and the Administration wants to see them down ahead of midterms this fall.

Here are the hottest real estate markets in June, according to Realtor.com. Note it isn’t the names you would think.

Interesting chart in today’s Journal about which breaks down the labor force participation rate by age cohort. The press keeps harping on the job market for entry level workers (essentially the Millennial Generation) however if you look at the labor force participation rate for that cohort, it is lower than the year 2000, but not by much. Nor is the problem the 55+ cohort (baby boomers). They are close to all-time highs. It is Gen X that is the issue – their cohort peaked around 83% in 2000 and now is closer to 80%. It is this generation that was hit hardest by the Great Recession (nailed right during the peak earnings years) and has yet to recover.

labor force participation rate by age cohort