Morning Report: Construction spending disappoints

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 3092 -21.25
Oil (WTI) 55.39 -0.54
10 year government bond yield 1.78%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.98%

 

Stocks are lower this morning on negative trade talk out of the White House. Bonds and MBS are up, following German Bund yields lower.

 

Home Prices rose 3.5% YOY in October, according to CoreLogic. “Nationally, over the past year, home prices are up 3.5% with the rate of growth accelerating from September into October,” said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “We expect home prices to rise at least another 5% over the next 12 months. Interestingly, this persistent increase in home prices isn’t deterring older millennials. In fact, 25% of those surveyed anticipate purchasing a home over the next six to eight months.” CoreLogic conducted a survey with RTi Research regarding to consumer-housing sentiment and found that millennials are largely unconcerned about qualifying for a mortgage.

 

Construction spending disappointed in October, falling 0.8% on a MOM basis and rising 1.1% on an annual basis. Residential Construction fell 0.9% on a monthly basis and was up only 0.5% year-over-year. Despite the lousy number, the National Association of Realtors is optimistic that homebuilding will step up in 2020. “This housing cycle is definitely unique in the sense that it’s been a decade and we’re not back to normal in terms of home building,” said Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “Many small-time builders are still out of the game. It was small-time builders in the aggregate that built many more homes than the big builders, and they’ve hesitated to get back in, even though it appears there is a money-making opportunity….All the factors that contribute to higher home sales like the job situation are terrific, and of course mortgage rates are critical to buying a home and those are favorable,” Yun said.” Note that construction loans increased 0.8% in the third quarter.

 

The Fed is considering raising its inflation target above its 2% target, according to the Financial Times. The idea (called the “make-up” strategy) would be to temporarily raise the target level if inflation comes in below 2% (the current target). The Fed fears deflation more than inflation, and has been utterly vexed by their inability to push inflation up to their target rate. This would be a signal to the markets that the Fed intends to keep rates lower for longer, although many members are worried about communication issues with the markets.

 

HUD has put out a request for information regarding affordable housing development, specifically which laws, regulations or administrative practices are inhibiting building. “Owning a home is an essential component of the American Dream. It is imperative that we remove regulatory barriers that prevent that dream from becoming a reality,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson, who is also Chairman of the White House Council on Eliminating Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing. “Through this request, communities across the country will have the opportunity to identify roadblocks to affordable housing and work with State, Federal, and local leaders to remove them.”

 

 

Morning Report: Brookings frets about non-bank origination market share

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 3074 4.25
Oil (WTI) 56.97 -0.24
10 year government bond yield 1.83%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.97%

 

Stocks are higher this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

Mortgage Applications fell 0.1% last week as purchases decreased 3% and refis increased 2%. “U.S. Treasury yields once again exhibited some intraweek volatility before declining sharply toward the end of the week,” said Joel Kan, MBA Associate Vice President of Economic and Industry Forecasting. “As a result, mortgage rates decreased, with the 30-year fixed rate falling below 4 percent again. In response to the lower rates, refinance applications climbed 2 percent, as homeowners with larger loan balances helped to keep the average refinance loan size elevated. Purchase applications fell slightly last week but remained almost 7 percent higher than a year ago.”

 

Job openings ticked down in September, according to the JOLTS survey. The quits rate fell to 2.3%, although it was lowest (1.7%) in the Northeast. The rest of the country was in the mid-2s. The Fed keeps a close eye on the quits rate as often presages an increase in wage growth. Construction job openings remain elevated, as does the quits rate for the sector.

 

construction labor market

 

The ISM non-manufacturing survey came in much better than expectations. Business is “brisk” and a shortgage of workers remains one of the biggest headaches. Whatever late-summer fears about an impending recession or business slowdown appear to have abated.

 

Productivity fell in the third quarter, according to BLS, as output increased 2.1% and hours worked increased 2.4%. Unit labor costs rose 3.3%, reflecting a 3.6% increase in compensation and the 0.3% drop in productivity. Manufacturing has been a weak spot, as decreasing demand has lowered output.

 

PennyMac has filed an antitrust lawsuit against Black Knight alleging that “Black Knight uses its market-dominating LoanSphere® MSP mortgage loan servicing system to engage in unfair business tactics that both entrap its licensees and create barriers to entry that stifle competition.” Basically Pennymac developed their own servicing infrastructure and Black Knight is suing them. Separately, Black Knight reported better than expected earnings this morning.

 

The government is getting worried about shadow banks (read independent mortgage bankers) and their market share in the mortgage origination business. Independent mortgage banks were the subject of a Brookings paper which points out they are vulnerable to financial shocks given that they rely on short-term funding in the money markets to fund their business. Note this isn’t only an origination issue – it is a servicing issue and the revolves around advances. For FHA and VA servicing these advances can spin out of control. This is probably what is behind the government’s recent moves to curb the use of the False Claims Act, which basically drove the big banks out of the FHA /  VA business. Nonbanks currently originate 90% of all GNMA loans.

 

nonbank share

Morning Report: Rates continue to move lower

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2746 -5
Oil (WTI) 54.23 0.76
10 year government bond yield 2.12%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.18%

 

Stocks are lower as trade fears dominate the market’s mood. Bonds and MBS are up (yields down). The 10 year hit 2.07% in the overnight session.

 

On the open, it is looking like mortgage backed securities are lagging the move in Treasuries. Prepayment speed worries are behind it. It may take a couple of days for mortgage rates to catch up.

 

The upcoming week will have a slew of important economic data, with construction spending, the ISM numbers and the jobs report on Friday. Productivity and costs will be another key number, although the Fed is more worried about a slowdown than an acceleration of inflation. After that, the Fed goes into their quiet period ahead of the FOMC meeting in two weeks.

 

Housing affordability is at its strongest in about a year, according to Black Knight Financial. The annual rate of housing inflation fell below the 25 year average of home price appreciation for the first time since 2012. 22% of median income was required to purchase the average house, which is will below the historical average of around 25%. Most of that has to do with lower interest rates, but slowing home price appreciation and rising incomes have been the drivers there.

 

According to Sentier Research, the median income in March of 2019 was $64,016. NAR has the median home price at $267,300. This puts the median house price to median income ratio at just under 4.2x. This is still elevated compared to historical numbers, but low interest rates offset the high multiple.

 

Affordability issues are driving a new business model for builders in some high-cost areas: build to rent. Toll Brothers is going to spend something like $60 million in a joint venture to build rental properties. “Renting by choice” is one of the new consumer trends, and it may not be going anywhere. The plan is to stick rental properties in planned communities that are more or less identical to neighboring properties. Why would people choose to rent? If they are worried about another housing bubble, they shouldn’t. That isn’t going to happen again for a long, long time. If they believe they need a 20% down payment, then the industry has an education job to do. If they are doing it because they want the freedom to move easily, that will probably change once they have kids.

 

Construction spending was flat in April, according to the Census Bureau. Residential was down 0.6% MOM and 11.2% YOY.

Morning Report: Job openings, and the Fed.

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2833.5 3
Eurostoxx index 381.78 0.68
Oil (WTI) 48.46 -0.14
10 year government bond yield 2.60%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.27%

 

Stocks are higher this morning on overseas strength. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

The big event this week will be the FOMC meeting on Tuesday and Wednesday. No changes are expected in interest rates, and the Street will be focused primarily on the dot plot and whether it is catching up with what the Fed Funds futures are saying. The December 2018 dot plot predicted that the end of 2019 Fed Funds rate would be in the 2.75% – 3% range, in other words two more rate hikes in 2019. A Reuters poll of economists forecasts 1 more hike this year. On the other hand, the markets are predicting a Fed Funds rate in the 2.25% – 2.5% range – in other words no change. To be fair, there has been a major change in market sentiment since December, but one of the two (the experts or the markets) has clearly got it wrong. In December, only 2 out of the 17 forecasts expected the Fed to not hike this year, and nobody was looking for a rate cut. The futures on the other hand are handicapping a 75% chance of no hike and about a 25% chance of a rate cut. This is a massive expectations gap.

 

Other than the FOMC meeting, there isn’t much in the way of important economic data. We will get leading economic indicators on Thursday, and existing home sales on Friday.

 

There were 7.58 million job openings at the end of January, which is close to the record set back in November. The 2018 data series was also revised upward, with about 353,000 additional job openings on average. The quits rate was 2.3%, which is where it has been for most of 2013 after that series was revised. The quits rate describes the number of people who are leaving their current job to get another, so it tends to lead increases in wage growth.

 

job openings

 

The housing industry is driven at least partially by new home construction, and there is a noted labor shortage in that sector. The problem is most acute in skilled trades, like electricians and plumbers, but unskilled supply is still an issue. The job opening rate for construction was 3.9% last month, as opposed to 3.3% a year ago. The quits rate edged up for the sector as well, rising to 2.5%.