Morning Report: 20 million jobs lost in April

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2876 13.1
Oil (WTI) 23.27 -1.29
10 year government bond yield 0.71%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.36%

 

Stocks are higher this morning as investors look forward to re-opening the economy. Bonds and MBS are lower as Treasury announced its quarterly refunding for next week.

 

The economy lost over 20 million jobs in April according to the ADP Employment report. The Street is looking for a -21.2 million print in this Friday’s jobs report.

 

Mortgage applications were flattish last week as purchases rose 6% and refis fell 2%. “Mortgage application volume was unchanged last week, even as the 30-year fixed rate mortgage declined to 3.40 percent – a new record in MBA’s survey,” said Mike Fratantoni, MBA’s Senior Vice President and Chief Economist. “Despite lower rates, refinance applications dropped, as many lenders are offering higher rates for refinances than for purchase loans, and others are suspending the availability of cash-out refinance loans because of their inability to sell them to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.”

 

Fannie Mae is extending reps and warrants relief through June.

 

The Fed is set to start buying corporate bonds, targeting “fallen angels” – in other words bonds from corporations who were downgraded due to COVID-19 issues – names like Macy’s and Occidental Petroleum. We are seeing investors begin to snap up these bonds, although many are trading above their recovery value in a bankruptcy, which means it all reality, it is just a greater fool trade. It seems to me if the Fed can fund a facility to buy department store debt they could set up a facility to fund mortgage advances.

 

Fed Head Richard Clarida thinks the economy will return to positive growth in the third quarter, although further help from the Fed may be necessary.

“Our policies we think will be very important in making sure that the rebound will be as robust as possible. We’re in a period of some very, very, very hard and difficult data that we’ve just not seen for the economy in our lifetimes, that’s for sure. But a third-quarter rebound “is one possibility. That is personally my baseline forecast,” he added. Realistically, it’s going to take some time for the labor market to recover from this shock. I do think the recovery can commence in the second half of the year”

Meanwhile, here is a tracker of how the different states are re-opening.

Morning Report: The Fed maintains rates at zero

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2908 -28.1
Oil (WTI) 16.81 3.29
10 year government bond yield 0.61%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.43%

 

Stocks are lower this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

The Fed maintained interest rates at 0% and pledged to continue to do what it can to support functioning markets, including buying agency mortgage backed securities and treasuries. They didn’t specify amounts, just that they wanted to keep orderly markets. As Dave Stevens noted, it is clear the Fed wants to see lower mortgage rates as a way to stimulate the economy. The problem with that of course is that the CARES Act is doing the exact opposite – it is restricting credit more than what happened in 2008. The MBA’s Mortgage Credit Availability index took a nosedive in March, and I think it will be much, much worse in April.

MCAI

Flagstar just announced a 5 point LLPA for cash-out refis. It is clear that these are the next program to go bye-bye, joining jumbos, non-QM, and sub 700 FHA. The law of unintended consequences rears its ugly head once again. I wonder if the government could tweak the CARES Act to make cash-outs ineligible for forbearance. That way the program could still exist and provide relief to people hit by COVID. Presumably if you do a cash-out, you have money to live on, so….

 

Initial Jobless Claims came in at 3.8 million, pushing the COVID job losses over 30 million.

 

Personal incomes fell 2% in March and personal spending fell 7%. The personal consumption expenditure index remained under control. I suspect that increasing food prices are being offset by lower energy prices.

 

Mortgage REITs AGNC and Annaly reported yesterday, and needless to say both were hit hard by COVID. Both have completed their deleveraging, and AGNC noted that its book value per share increased by 8% in April, after declining about 22% in Q1. For the agency REITs, it looks like the crisis is over.

 

Another round of stimulus may be a bridge too far. Nancy Pelosi wants to force states to vote by mail, and that is a non-starter with Republicans. Mitch McConnell wants lawsuit protection for businesses that remain open during the COVID crisis, and that is a non-starter to Democrats. As Travelers noted on its conference call, trial lawyers smell an opportunity here and are ginning up lawsuits as we speak.

Morning Report: First quarter GDP falls 4.8%

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2915 48.1
Oil (WTI) 15.71 3.29
10 year government bond yield 0.61%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.43%

 

Stocks are higher this morning despite a disappointing GDP print. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

First quarter GDP fell 4.8% as the COVID lockdown depressed consumer spending, which fell 7.6%. The price index rose 1.3%, and that will be a number to watch going forward. Inflation is too much money chasing too few goods. We have managed to sidestep inflation in the past because shortages weren’t a problem. Now they are. Do you remember paying a buck a roll for TP last year? How about chicken? It averaged $3.11 a pound last year. At the local Stop and Shop it is now $3.80, and with the Tyson closures it will go higher. The black swan out of this whole thing could be a resurgence of inflation, right when that is the last thing the economy needs. 

 

The FOMC will make their announcement at 2:00 pm today. Not sure what they can say,(Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in March seems to indicate the economy has hit a brick wall and is sinking like an anvil….) and I can’t see it being market-moving. The mortgage industry would love to see something about a servicing advance repo line, but aside from accepting newer forms of collateral I don’t think there is much more they can do.

 

Mortgage applications fell 3.3% last week as purchases rose 12% and refis fell 7.5%. The refi market continues to tighten as investors add overlays to cash-outs. The strength in the purchase market is encouraging. Separately, the homeownership rate hit 63.5% in the first quarter, the highest since 2013. I think for many urban millennials with families, the COVID Crisis will trigger a flight to the suburbs, which should bump up the homeownership rate going forward.

 

According to a NPR poll, half of Americans have been financially affected by the Coronavirus. If that is the case, then forbearance numbers are going up.

 

Consumer confidence fell from 119 to 87, which was worse than expected.

 

 

Morning Report: Shelter in place orders are being relaxed

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2856 28.1
Oil (WTI) 12.71 -4.29
10 year government bond yield 0.63%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.43%

 

Stocks are higher this morning on optimism that we have turned the corner on the COVID-19 crisis. Bonds and MBS are down.

 

In terms of economic data, the big number will be the first pass at Q1 GDP will be released on Wednesday. The consensus is that GDP contracted 3.8% as consumer spending falls 1.5%. Trump Administration Advisor Kevin Hassett thinks the economy could contract 30% in Q2.

 

The Fed will have the April FOMC meeting this week, and with rates already at zero, it probably won’t have the impact it normally has. Speaking of the Fed, they are ratcheting back MBS purchases again this week, with only $8 billion a day.

 

It looks like some states are beginning to relax the shelter-in-place orders, and even New York is looking to ease things in mid-May. If these states end up seeing no big uptick in cases, I expect the rest of the country to follow pretty quickly. Especially if the number of deaths settles in under 100k. FWIW, I think if most of the country is back to normal by Memorial Day, we can take the Great Depression II economic forecasts off the table.

 

Ex MBA President wrote a scathing editorial in Housing Wire regarding Mark Calabria and how he is the worst person for the job right now. In Mark’s defense, his job is to protect the GSEs and (and therefore the taxpayer), however Dave is correct that taking a cavalier attitude with non-bank servicers is not the best look right now when (a) the government imposed this forbearance period on everyone and (a) the GSEs are part of the government. If the government goes forward and imposes all of these costs on the industry, the least it can do is help mitigate those as much as it can. Perhaps the aid doesn’t need to come from Fannie and Freddie, but the government should provide it from somewhere.

 

Home price appreciation is slowing, but not dropping yet, according to Realtor.com. Inventory is tight, largely driven by sellers who are pulling their homes off the market. This could be due to fears of not getting the best price, or it could be due to people wanting to keep potentially sick strangers from entering their home.

 

Pulte noted on its Q1 conference call that pricing is holding up, and cancellations are unexpectedly small – about 2% and only due to job losses. Orders on the other hand are weak. In the first week of March, they got over 800 orders. By the last week of March it was 140.

 

Rent strikes are beginning to pop up in NYC. This one is not the usual tenant versus landlord situation where there is a dispute over fixing things. This is meant to be a political statement to goad lawmakers into doing something for renters. Bold strategy, Cotton…

Morning Report: 22 million jobs lost in the past month

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2790 15.1
Oil (WTI) 20.13 0.29
10 year government bond yield 0.61%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.37%

 

Stocks are higher this morning as the Trump Administration works on how to re-open the economy. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

The Trump Administration is looking to ease the lockdown as it looks like cases have peaked in the US. He is planning to hold a conference call with governors this afternoon and will announce something by the end of the day. Of course it will be up to the states and local governments to make the ultimate decisions for their respective jurisdictions. State and local governments are starting to get starved for cash as sales taxes have fallen off a cliff. In all honesty, if masks and gloves work (and they appear to), then it probably makes sense to have people return to work wearing them. Note that the food supply is at risk for shortages, so that is something the government must work to avoid.

 

Initial Jobless Claims fell to 5.25 million last week. Over the past month, 22 million people have lost their jobs. That is about 34 jobs lost per case of the virus, and 770 per death from the illness.

 

Housing starts fell to 1.216 million. This is down 22% from February, but is actually up 1.4% on a YOY basis. Building permits came in at 1.35 million, which was down 6.8% sequentially, but up 5% on an annual basis. Starts are going to be super-sensitive to local economies. The rumor is that KB Home simply walked away from all their land deposits in Las Vegas.

 

Neel Kashkari is recommending that the big banks raise $200 billion in capital to help buffer against the effects of the recession. Note that Shelia Bair was jawboning the Fed to force the banks to suspend dividends and bonuses, the way most European banks have. Of course the European banks are in much weaker capital positions than the US banks, and the US banks have already suspended share buybacks. Oh, and bonuses are paid at the end of the year, so that is just a throwaway talking point. But bonuses, buybacks, and dividends are kind of an evergreen topic for liberal policy types.

 

The NHMC found that 84% of renters made a full or partial April rent payment. As of a week ago, that number was only 69%. Good news for the apartment REITs.

“We are pleased to see that it appears that the vast majority of apartment residents who can pay their rent are doing so to help ensure that their properties can continue to operate safely and so apartment owners can help residents who legitimately need help,” said Doug Bibby, President of NMHC. “Unfortunately, unemployment levels are continuing to rise and delays have been reported in getting assistance to residents, which could affect May’s rent levels. It is our hope that, as residents begin receiving the direct payments and the enhanced unemployment benefits the federal government passed, we will continue to see improvements in rent payments.”

“Anecdotally, we are hearing that different parts of the industry are experiencing different levels of rent payments,” said David Schwartz, NMHC Chair and CEO Chairman of Chicago-based Waterton. “As you would expect, more expensive Class A properties, whose resident base may be more able to work from home, are reporting much higher percentage of rent payments than operators of more affordable workforce properties whose residents are more likely to have had their incomes disrupted because of the pandemic.”

 

 

Morning Report: Retail sales take a dive

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2776 -72.1
Oil (WTI) 20.03 0.29
10 year government bond yield 0.66%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.37%

 

Stocks are lower this morning on overseas weakness. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

It is April 15, and taxes are not due. People are starting to get their stimulus checks from the government. The Fed is beginning to advise on how to get the economy started again. On one hand, the economy cannot afford the roughly $25 billion a day in lost output the lockdown costs. On the other hand, if we re-open prematurely and have a second wave of infections, the economic costs could be worse. At the end of the day, people simply aren’t going to put up with this much longer. In places where there are few cases, people are simply going to ignore the edicts out of Washington and get back to work. The local governments are going to look the other way because they need the revenue as badly as people need their paychecks.

 

Mortgage Applications rose 7% as purchases fell 2% and refis increased 10%. Purchase activity will be muted as in-home showings and appraisal issues are a problem. Separately, the homebuilder sentiment index collapsed in April, from 60 to 30.

 

Retail sales fell 8.7% in March, as weakness in autos and gasoline was offset by an increase in TP and Purell.

 

Like the other big banks, Citi’s earnings took a hit as the company reserved $5 billion for expected defaults. Citi’s exposure is less in mortgages than, say Wells, but it is huge in credit cards and commercial real estate.

 

Industrial production fell 5.4% in March, while manufacturing production fell 6.3%. Capacity Utilization fell from 77% to 72.7%.

 

If you apply for forbearance, the initial negotiating position for most banks will be that the entire amount will be due immediately at the end of the forbearance period. For what its worth, I suspect this is to deal with the precautionary forbearance borrowers, those who are gaming the system by saying “I think I could get laid off, so I will suspend my mortgage payments for 90 days and keep them in the bank. At the end of the period, I will just send it all in at once.” At the end of the day, the government should have required some sort of proof of hardship. Given that the precautionary forbearance requests will compete with the people who actually need the help, servicers are overwhelmed with requests, and it seems forbearance will go to the borrowers who have the patience and free time to sit on hold for hours. The government really should have considered servicer capacity to handle requests (among other things) when it drafted the law.

 

 

Morning Report: More action out of the Fed.

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2799 45.4
Oil (WTI) 26.56 1.49
10 year government bond yield 0.75%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.47%

 

Stocks are higher this morning on optimism that things are turning the corner with the COVID-19 crisis. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

The bond market closes early today, and markets will be closed on Friday.

 

6.6 million people filed for unemployment benefits last week. That puts the number of COVID-19 job losses at around 16.5 million total.

 

The Fed unveiled a new round of measures to support the economy this morning. They include a program to augment the SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program by supplying liquidity to banks that participate, allowing them to pledge the actual loans as collateral. The Fed will also purchase loans under the Main Street Lending Program. The TALF program will be increased and more direct aid will be sent to state and local governments.

The Main Street Program will offer 4 year loans to companies employing up to 10,000 workers with revenues under 2.5 billion. P&I will be deferred for one year. The banks will retain 5% of the loan, and can sell the remaining 95% to the Fed.

Interestingly there is still no facility for mortgage servicers. It looks like the issue is finally getting the attention of lawmakers, however we still don’t have anything. In his comments at the Brookings Institution, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said that he is watching the mortgage servicers closely, which means the Fed is probably considering some sort of relief.

 

Looks like Wells is out of the penalty box, at least as far as SBA loans go.

 

Jerome Powell said the Fed will act “forcefully and aggressively” to until the economy fully recovers. “Many of the programs we are undertaking to support the flow of credit rely on emergency lending powers … We will continue to use these powers forcefully, proactively, and aggressively until we are confident that we are solidly on the road to recovery,” Powell said in prepared remarks for an online event hosted by the Brookings Institution.