Morning Report: A look ahead to the regulatory environment for the financial industry

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2996 7.25
Oil (WTI) 53.47 -0.44
10 year government bond yield 1.78%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.97%

 

Stocks are higher this morning on expectations of an orderly Brexit and optimism on trade. Bonds and MBS are down.

 

Not a lot of market-moving data this week, although we will get a lot of housing indicators, with existing home sales, new home sales, and house prices. Note the FOMC meets next week, and it is looking like a lock that they will cut rates. The Fed funds futures are now handicapping a 91% chance of a cut.

 

The Index of Leading Economic Indicators declined in September, as trade concerns and manufacturing offset strength in other areas. “The US LEI declined in September because of weaknesses in the manufacturing sector and the interest rate spread which were only partially offset by rising stock prices and a positive contribution from the Leading Credit Index,” said Ataman Ozyildirim, Senior Director of Economic Research at The Conference Board. “The LEI reflects uncertainty in the outlook and falling business expectations, brought on by the downturn in the industrial sector and trade disputes. Looking ahead, the LEI is consistent with an economy that is still growing, albeit more slowly, through the end of the year and into 2020.”

 

It looks like the structure of the CFPB is going to be decided by the Supreme Court. The issue with the CFPB goes back to its structure, which makes it nearly impossible to remove a director. The idea was to make the CFPB less influenced by politics, however it also makes it completely immune to oversight and accountability. The case will move forward without the support of the government, as CFPB Director Kathy Kraninger doesn’t support the structure of the agency either. If the CFPB’s structure is declared unconstitutional, it wouldn’t mean the end of the agency, it would mean that the single, unfireable director would be replaced by a bipartisan board, which was actually the initial proposal when the CFPB was created during the drafting of Dodd-Frank.

 

Elizabeth Warren threatened to ban fracking if she wins the presidency. “On my first day as president, I will sign an executive order that puts a total moratorium on all new fossil fuel leases for drilling offshore and on public lands. And I will ban fracking—everywhere.” Needless to say, this would be incredibly disruptive to the US economy as natural gas prices would increase to $9.00 to $15 per mBTU, compared to current prices of around $2.00 – $2.50. Since natural gas is the main way we generate electricity, consumers and industry would feel it immediately, and this would cause uncertainty on steroids, and make Trump’s trade concerns look like a minor annoyance. She would be able to implement many changes via executive order, and she intends to use it. Given that Joe Biden is having trouble fundraising, it is looking more like a lock that she gets the nomination. Even some left-leaning pundits are worried.

 

What would that mean for the mortgage banking business? Regulations will undoubtedly be tightened, but they probably will affect the bigger banks more than the independent operators. She says she wants to re-implement Glass-Steagall, which is really a solution in search of a problem. However, if she succeeds in raising taxes and energy prices as much as she intends, it would almost certainly be the final nail in the longest running expansion ever, and that means the Fed Funds rate is probably heading back to zero. A return to ZIRP almost certainly means the 10 year will breach the 1.47% low set in 2012, which will would create another refi wave similar to the years immediately after the financial crisis. So, perversely a Warren presidency could be great for the mortgage banking business, as the industry feasts on easy refinances.

Morning Report: Disappointing ADP print

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2883 13.25
Eurostoxx index 384.71 1.04
Oil (WTI) 62.04 0.65
10 year government bond yield 2.51%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.17%

 

Stocks are higher this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

ADP reported that the private sector created 129,000 jobs in March. Education and health reported the biggest increase, while the financial sector and the construction sector cut jobs. The Street is looking for 170,000 new jobs in Friday’s employment situation report. The Street will look at the payroll number, but the more important one is the average hourly earnings number. The Street is forecasting a 0.3% MOM and 3.4% YOY gain.

 

Construction spending rose 1% in January, and is up 1% on an annual basis. Residential construction rose 1% on a MOM basis, but is down 3.6% YOY. Construction spending was probably affected at least somewhat by the partial government shutdown at the end of last year / beginning of this year.

 

The manufacturing sector continues to do well, with the ISM Manufacturing Index hitting 55.3 in March. New Orders, Production, and Employment were the drivers of the increase. I found this comment interesting: “Business remains very strong amid rumors of a slowdown, but forecasts do not indicate this. Electronics are at tight capacity from manufacturers, with no [change] in the near future.” (Transportation Equipment) The transportation sector touches most parts of the economy, so it has always been the equivalent of the canary in a coal mine. But overall, this report isn’t showing any signs of economic weakness.

 

Durable Goods orders however did show some weakness. Durable Goods orders fell 1.6% in February, however they were up slightly when you strip out the volatile transportation sector. Core Capital Goods (a proxy for business capital expenditures) fell slightly. January’s numbers were revised upward, so the report isn’t as bad as it initially appears.

 

Ron Wyden wants your unrealized capital gains to be taxed every year. This is more or less an Overton Window widening exercise and has a less than zero percent chance of gaining mainstream Democratic support, let alone Republican support. He would also increase the capital gains tax to 37%. It would be like the government assessing you every year on the increase Zillow reports for your home and sending you a bill for 37% of it. The final plan will probably exempt your primary residence, but still – it would force you to sell investments you may not want to sell in order to pay the tax.

 

Further, in the political space, Elizabeth Warren is taking a victory lap after Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan’s retirement. She is pushing for laws to make it easier for the government to prosecute corporate executives who don’t have firsthand knowledge of crimes their subordinates are doing.

 

That was quick: After a big open on Friday, Lyft is now trading below its IPO price. The big gains seem to be reaped pre-IPO anymore, when the company is revalued at each funding round. By the time it hits the IPO phase, it is priced for perfection. Remember, Blue Apron, which went public at $10 a share during the summer of 2017? It is now a drill bit.