Morning Report: Fed Funds forecasts and mortgage rates.

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2895.75 0.75
Oil (WTI) 51.89 -0.62
10 year government bond yield 2.11%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.12%

 

Stocks are flat this morning as we enter Fed week. Bonds and MBS are flat as well.

 

The big event this week will be the FOMC meeting which starts Tuesday. Given the disconnect between the market’s perception of the road ahead and the Fed’s prior forecast, something has to give. FWIW, the market is now assigning a 20% chance they will ease by 25 basis points at this meeting. By the December meeting, the market is forecasting the FOMC will cut rates either 2 or 3 times!

 

fed funds futures dec 19

 

Compare that to the March 2019 dot plot, which showed most members of the FOMC thought rates would be unchanged for the year and about 1/4 of the members wanted to see a rate hike:

 

dot plot Mar 2019

If the Fed Funds futures are correct and we are looking at a 1.5% Fed Funds rate, where will mortgage rates go? If history is any guide, probably nowhere. The last time the Fed Funds rate was around 1.5% (late Dec 2017), the 30 year fixed rate mortgage (according to the MBA) was in the low 4% range, in other words, right about here.  Long term rates have already priced in the move. MBA 30 year FRM chart:

 

MBA mortgage rate

 

Quicken Loans settled with the DOJ over false claims allegations regarding FHA origination going back to 2015. The case was dismissed and Quicken settled for $32.5 million with no admission of guilt. Quicken fought the case the entire way, and eventually narrowed it down to a tiny fraction of what the Obama Administration wanted. Quicken Vice Chairman Bill Emerson said: “I think the current HUD administration realized how faulty the previous administration’s tactics were, and frankly, as we’ve said before, we viewed them as extortionist tactics and we just could not go along with that,” Emerson said. “We know we didn’t do anything wrong and so we continued to fight, and if that somehow caused the new administration to evaluate it differently, then great.”

 

Ed Demarco discusses the ways that private capital can be drawn back into the mortgage market. First, the CFPB’s ATR and QM rules need to change to bring down the allowable DTI ratios on Fannie and Freddie loans to that of the rest of the market. This is known as the QM patch, which basically says that any loans that meet F&F criteria meet the ability to repay test. The problem is that the QM laws specify a max DTI ratio of 43% and the GSEs allow up to 50%. This gives Fan and Fred a huge advantage over other lenders. The second issue revolves around the SEC and refining the data definitions in the registration rules. Third, Fan and Fred have all sorts of mortgage performance data that is unavailable to the broader market, and leveling the playing field would mean allowing other participants to see that data. Note however that DeMarco is only looking at the issue from the standpoint of originators. Buyers of private label securities have other issues that are still unresolved, especially when the issuer of the bonds also retains servicing. There is a conflict of interest issue that must be resolved as well. I discussed this about a year ago in Housing Wire.

 

Profitability improved for independent mortgage bankers in the fist quarter of 2019. Average revenue per loan came in at $9584, while average cost per loan was $9,299, or a net gain of $285 per loan, compared to a loss of $200 a loan in the fourth quarter. It looks like mortgage bankers reported a loss in the first quarter of 2018 as well.

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Morning Report: Housing cycles and bond markets.

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2815 -4
Eurostoxx index 377.4 1.8
Oil (WTI) 58.12 -0.14
10 year government bond yield 2.63%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.28%

 

Stocks are lower this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

Initial Jobless Claims fell slightly to 224k last week.

 

Durable Goods orders increased 0.4% in February, driven by an increase in commercial jet orders. Ex-transportation, they were down 0.1%. Core capital goods increased 0.8% as companies continue to plow capital back into expansion opportunities. Much of the increase in capital expenditures was in machinery, which is a positive sign for manufacturing. Still, economists are cautious on Q1 GDP, with many forecasting sub 1% growth for the quarter.

 

Construction spending rose 1.3% MOM and is up 0.3% YOY. Residential construction was down on a MOM and YOY basis. Housing continues to punch below its weight. Since construction is seasonally affected, January numbers tend to be a bit more volatile and have less meaning than summer numbers.

 

The MBA released its paper on CFPB 2.0, where they list out their recommendations for the CFPB. Much of what they say is similar to what Mick Mulvaney and Kathy Kraninger have been doing – increasing transparency regarding rulemaking and giving more guidance on what is legal and illegal. The Obama / Cordray CFPB was purposefully vague in promulgating rules, which makes life easier for regulators but makes it harder for industry participants. Regulation by enforcement was the MO of the Cordray CFPB, which ended with the new Administration, and the MBA agrees.

 

Specific to the mortgage business, the MBA recommends that the CFPB allow loan officers to cut their compensation in response to competitive dynamics, to extend the “GSE patch” which means loans that are GSE / government eligible are automatically considered to be QM compliant, to allow mortgage companies to pass on error costs to loan officers, and to raise the cap on points and fees.

 

CoreLogic looks at home price appreciation and the economic cycle. The punch line: While the current expansion is just short of a record length, and home price appreciation is declining, it doesn’t necessarily mean that house prices are in for a decline. In fact, housing typically weathers recessions quite well. I could caveat that the chart below only looks at a bond bull market. The 1978 – 1982 timespan of the misery index and inflation marked the bottom of the Great Bond Bear Market that lasted from the mid 1950s to the early 80s. The Great Bond Bull Market that began in the early 80s ended a few years ago, and while a bear market probably hasn’t begun yet the tailwind of interest rates falling from 17% to 0% isn’t going to be around this time. Finally, there are a few massive supports for the real estate market: rising wages, low inventory, and demographics. It is hard to imagine another 2008 happening if the economy peters out.

 

corelogic home prices

Morning Report: Friday’s jobs report in perspective

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2756 0.4
Eurostoxx index 371.87 1.24
Oil (WTI) 56.47 0.4
10 year government bond yield 2.65%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.32%

 

Stocks are flattish on no real news. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

The upcoming week has a lot of economic data, however most of it is not housing related, and probably won’t be market-moving either. The biggest housing-related number will be new home sales and construction spending. We will also get inflation data and industrial production.

 

Friday’s payroll number was a definite downward surprise, and the question is whether this indicates a slowing labor market? Extremely low job prints happen occasionally we had sub-20k months in Sep 2017 and May 2016. Both prints ended up being a blip, and there is a good chance this gets revised upward in next month’s number. The number to take away from the jobs report is the increase in average hourly earnings. Average hourly earnings are a notoriously non-volatile series, and this one keeps inexorably increasing by larger and larger amounts.

 

average hourly earnings

 

Just because the US economy is doing relatively well, that doesn’t mean things are rosy overseas. China has had some bad days in the stock market, and the cracks are starting to appear in the economy. In Europe, the German Bund yield (The European benchmark) is about to go negative. Growth estimates have been slashed from 1.7% to 1.1%. So there is a bit of a global slowdown, and it means that we will probably take some shrapnel in the form of lower rates.

 

CFPB Chair Kathy Kraninger appeared before the House Financial Services Committee last week, and the commentary broke down along partisan lines. Democrats, pining for the Cordray days, had a laundry list of complaints, ranging from a de-emphasis on payday lenders to kvetching about changes in internal reporting lines. Republicans generally supported her and the agency’s end of regulation by enforcement. Kraninger reaffirmed the Agency’s commitment to chasing bad financial actors.

Morning Report: Strong wage growth in December

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2480 32.75
Eurostoxx index 338.85 4.35
Oil (WTI) 48.05 0.95
10 year government bond yield 2.61%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.43%

 

Stocks are higher on no real news. Bonds and MBS are down.

 

Jobs report data dump:

  • Nonfarm payrolls up 312k, street expectation 177k
  • Average hourly earnings up 0.4% MOM / 3.2% YOY, street expectation 0.3% / 3.1%
  • Labor force participation rate 63.1%, November 62.9%
  • Unemployment rate 3.9%, street expectation 3.7%

Overall a strong report. The uptick in the unemployment rate was a surprise, but is still below 4% and the labor force increased by quite a bit. Wages are increasing smartly, rising 3.2%. Those in the press (and DC) hoping for recessionary data will be disappointed with this report.

 

Yesterday, we touched 2.57% on the 10 year bond yield. If you were hoping to see that reflected in mortgage rates, you were probably disappointed. MBS are lagging the move in Treasuries (as usual).

 

The action in the Fed funds futures is truly astounding. There has been a complete sea-change in market perception over the past month. Look at the January 2020 futures (a year from now). Implied probability of another hike in 2019? Zero. Chance of a rate cut? Better than 50/50. Note the implied probabilities a month ago versus today. The market is saying the Fed overshot.

 

fed fund futures dec 2019

 

Compare that to the dot plot from the December meeting which suggests another 50 basis points of hikes:

 

dot plot

 

This is an astounding change in sentiment in just a month. It is certainly possible that the Fed Funds futures have it wrong, but it is clear the market and the Fed aren’t seeing the future even remotely the same.

 

Chinese demand is collapsing, as evidenced by falling consumption tax receipts. People have known that China has a real estate bubble and a shaky banking system for a while, but bubbles generally go on for longer than anyone ever expects. With the Chinese pulling out of the hot US markets, we are seeing a decline in places like Manhattan, where the median apartment price fell below $1 million for the first time in 3 years. There is a 16 month supply of luxury apartments in Manhattan, compared to an overall 4.5 month supply of existing homes for sale in the US. 6.5 month’s worth is generally considered a balanced market. The same thing is happening in the hot West Coast markets.

 

Kathy Kraninger, the new head of the CFPB sent an email to staffers saying that the agency will “continue to vigorously enforce the law,” but keep in mind “costs and benefits” and “maintain an open mind, without presumption of guilt.” So, she sounds like a continuation of the Mick Mulvaney approach and not a return to the Cordray “regulation by enforcement” model.

 

Mr Cooper bought IBM’s $48 billion servicing portfolio.

Morning Report: The CFPB wants to define the term “abusive.”

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2810 2.75
Eurostoxx index 364.61 -0.6
Oil (WTI) 71.52 -0.5
10 year government bond yield 3.18%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.95%

 

Stocks are flattish this morning after yesterday’s huge rally. Bonds and MBS are down.

 

We will get the minutes of the September FOMC meeting today at 2:00 pm. Be careful locking around that period. They usually aren’t market-moving, but you never know.

 

Lots of people are returning from the MBA conference in Washington, DC, so let’s catch up on the economic data from the past couple of days.

 

Job openings hit a record (going back to 2000) last month as 7.1 million positions went unfilled. The quits rate was unchanged at 2.4%. The quits rate has been steadily inching upward and we are back to early 2001 levels. The quits rate is generally considered to be a predictor of wage inflation.

 

quits rate

 

Retail sales for September disappointed at the headline level, rising only 0.1%. The control group, which strips out autos, gas stations, and building materials rose 0.5%, which was towards the higher end of expectations. Department Stores were especially weak, which isn’t surprising given that Sears just filed for bankruptcy. Overall, consumption for the third quarter looks to have been strong, which will support a good GDP number.

 

Industrial production rose 0.3% last month, and manufacturing production rose 0.2%. Capacity Utilization was steady at 78.1%. Manufacturing was up about 3.5% YOY, which is an inflation-adjusted number. If you add back 2.5% inflation, we are looking at 6% nominal growth, which is a very respectable number. Suffice it to say that whatever trade wars seem to be occurring have yet to show up in the numbers. Also, with capacity utilization stuck below 80%, we don’t have inflationary pressure from more marginal (and costly) production being used.

 

Mortgage applications fell 7% last week as purchases fell 6% and refis fell 9%. Seasonal adjustments are primarily responsible; unadjusted applications were more or less flat, which is kind of impressive given that rates rose about 16 basis points in the previous two weeks.

 

CFPB Chairman Mick Mulvaney told the MBA conference that regulation by enforcement is dead. Regulation by enforcement was a prime tactic of the Cordray regime, which was characterized by intentionally vague rules. Dodd-Frank inserted the term “abusive” into the vernacular, and while words like “fair” and “unfair” have been litigated over the past century such that we all have a pretty good legal idea of what they mean, “abusive” is still pretty much a blank canvas. The CFPB is working on a definition of what the term actually means.

 

“We know what ‘unfair’ is,” Mulvaney said. “We know what ‘deceptive is; I’m not sure we know how to define ‘abusive.’ This is an example of how we are looking at issues….”We are still Elizabeth Warren’s child, for better or worse. We’re not the FDIC; we’re not the SEC…I want the Bureau to get there, to where we are associated with other regulators and not controversial because of its partisan circumstances, which colors what half of Americans think of it.”

 

“Partisan” is a good description of how the agency was initially staffed. Here is one lawyer’s description of how things went. The agency ensured that only Democrats who were inherently hostile to the financial industry were hired to staff out the agency. Mulvaney may have different goals than Richard Cordray, but the rank-and-file of the agency do not.

 

Trulia noted that price reductions at the high end of the market accelerated in July and August. Over 17% of US listings had a price cut during August. Between tax reform, higher rates, and higher prices it was only a matter of time before we started seeing an impact at the higher price points. Don’t forget that in the aftermath of the crisis, luxury real estate was about the only sector that was working for homebuilders. While the West Coast has been able to absorb that inventory, the East Coast definitely has not. Indeed, tony NYC suburbs are swollen with $1 million + properties for sale, and some have gone as far as to ban “for sale” signs.

 

Trump continued to jawbone the Fed, calling it his “biggest threat.” FWIW, there isn’t a politician on the planet that actually likes tightening cycles, but most have the common sense not to say anything about.

Morning Report: Out: NAFTA. In: USMCA.

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2933 14.75
Eurostoxx index 384.63 1.45
Oil (WTI) 73.2 -0.09
10 year government bond yield 3.09%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.71%

 

Stocks are higher this morning after NAFTA was saved over the weekend. Bonds and MBS are down small.

 

Canada and the US reached an agreement late last night to keep Canada in NAFTA (which will be renamed). The biggest change in NAFTA makes it harder for automakers to build in Mexico, where labor is cheaper. Canada got to keep a trade dispute mechanism. The treaty will go to Congress for approval. “It is a great deal for all three countries, solves the many deficiencies and mistakes in NAFTA, greatly opens markets to our Farmers and Manufacturers, reduce Trade Barriers to the U.S. and will bring all three Great Nations closer together in competition with the rest of the world,” wrote Trump last night. There is a press conference scheduled for 11:00 am.

 

Manufacturing continues to impress, with the ISM survey coming in at 59.8. New orders decelerated, while production and employment accelerated. Tariffs continue to weigh on manufacturers, and the clarity of having NAFTA (sorry USMCA) off the table should help somewhat, but we still are nowhere near any sort of resolution with China. Still, the market is strong, and labor issues remain. Wages are going to increase. They have to.

 

The CFPB’s head of fair lending is under fire for blog posts in the past, where hate crimes were discussed. The blog post in question is a mock legal debate – hardly an inflammatory screed – and is largely a thought crime for entertaining the notion that hate crimes are often hoaxes. Still, some of the employees at the CFPB are having issues with it. Ultimately, most of the CFPB staffers are holdovers from the Cordray “push the envelope” days, and they are chafing under the new approach of the CFPB – “enforce the law as written and then stop.”

 

This should be a big week ahead with the jobs report on Friday and a lot of Fed-speak. The snapback rally in the 10 year appears to be over, and the new NAFTA agreement definitely points to more expensive cars in the future. That could be offset by lower ag prices, but we will see. Don’t know how lumber will be affected either, but building materials are big inputs to inflation, especially housing inflation.

 

Mortgage rates increased by 3 basis points during September, making this the 10th month in a row where they have increased. This is affecting affordability, and the share of homes selling above their listing price declined. The drop is mainly in the super hot markets on the West Coast, but there is no doubt that home price appreciation is moderating. Either wages have to catch up or home prices are going nowhere for a while. With rates pushing 5%, will we see a slowdown in housing? Probably not – Zillow estimates that 6% is the number to watch.

 

mortgage rate

 

Construction spending increased by a hair in August, increasing 0.1% MOM. On a YOY basis, we are still up 6.5%. Residential construction fell, and was up only 4.1% YOY. Where was the activity? Office and commercial.

 

The Atlanta Fed cut their third quarter growth rate estimate to 3.6% from 3.8%. Still think consumption could surprise to the upside for the year, but want to hear what the retailers report for back to school.

 

 

Morning Report: Jerome Powell speaks at Jackson Hole

Vital Statistic:

Last Change
S&P futures 2865 6.75
Eurostoxx index 383.72 0.32
Oil (WTI) 68.91 1.08
10 Year Government Bond Yield 2.85%
30 Year fixed rate mortgage 4.58%

Stocks are higher this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are down.

Another slow news day. Low level talks between China and the US over trade didn’t really go anywhere.

Durable Goods orders fell 1.7% in July on weak aircraft orders, but the core capital goods rate jumped 1.4%, which shows another month of strong business investment, particularly business equipment. Many economists had been skeptical that cutting corporate taxes would increase capital expenditures, but it looks like it has. Theory certainly predicted it would.

Jerome Powell is speaking in Jackson Hole this morning. There probably won’t be anything market moving, but just be aware. The conference will focus on a academic papers for the most part. The agenda is here. One of the papers argues that the Fed should continue to hike rates, even in the absence of current indications of inflation, if the unemployment rate is below the long-term sustainable rate. Since monetary policy acts with a lag, a low unemployment rate can increase inflationary pressures before monetary policy takes effect.

The Fed faces two major risks of “moving too fast and needlessly shortening the expansion, versus moving too slowly and risking a destabilizing overheating,” said Mr. Powell. “I see the current path of gradually raising interest rates as the [Federal Open Market Committee’s] approach to taking seriously both of these risks. In other words, expect maybe 2 more hikes this year, and maybe one or two more next year.

The Fed funds futures increased their handicapping of a Dec hike slightly, to 68% (Sep is a given). Longer term, the September 2019 futures predictions look like this:

fed funds futures

The central tendency seems to be 2 more hikes this year, one more next year, and then the Fed takes a break. Slightly more people think the Fed stops after 2 hikes than those who think the Fed does 4 or more.

St. Louis Fed President James Bullard would vote to maintain the current Fed Funds rate through the end of the year. “If it was just me, I’d stand pat where we are and I’d try to react to data as it comes in,” he said Friday in an interview with CNBC’s Steve Liesman. “I just don’t see much inflation pressure. … I’m an inflation hawk, but I just don’t see that developing. … I just don’t think this is a situation where we have to be pre-emptive.” He also sees the economy slowing next year, and in 2020.

The Senate Banking Committee voted 13-12 along party lines to advance the nomination of Kathy Kraninger to run the CFPB. Remember if Kraninger is rejected, Mick Mulvaney continues to run the agency, which was probably the plan all along.