Morning Report: Fannie / Freddie sale by 2022?

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 3088 -6.25
Oil (WTI) 57.59 0.44
10 year government bond yield 1.83%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.00%

 

Stocks are lower this morning on weak overseas economic data. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

Initial Jobless Claims rose to 225k last week. We are still at extremely low levels historically. Jerome Powell will be testifying today at 10:00 am. Nothing earth-shattering came out of his testimony yesterday, although he pushed back on Trump’s suggestion that the Fed should cut rates below zero.

 

Inflation at the wholesale level came in a little hotter than expected, with the Producer Price Index rising 0.4%% MOM and 1.1% YOY. Ex-food and energy, it rose 0.3% MOM and 1.6% YOY. These readings are still well below what the Fed would like to see, which is inflation at 2%.

 

Mark Calabria said that Fannie and Fred could be ready to exit government conservatorship by 2022. “If all goes well, 2021, 2022 we will see very large public offerings from these companies,” Calabria said at an event sponsored by the American Association of Residential Mortgage Regulators and the Conference of State Bank Supervisors. “The consent decree will be able to give that window where they can go to market, do an offering and still operate under a way where we’ve got some prudential safeguards.” Fannie and Fred stock fell on the news. Fannie’s stock has been a trader’s dream, with plenty of volatility to play with.

 

FNMA chart

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Morning Report: Ben Carson adjusts enforcement to entice banks back into FHA lending

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 3035 -2.25
Oil (WTI) 54.91 -0.84
10 year government bond yield 1.83%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.03%

 

Stocks are flattish as earnings continue to come in and the Fed begins its two-day FOMC meeting. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

Ben Carson has “slayed” the False Claims Act “monster” that has kept banks out of FHA lending. The False Claims Act was used as a cudgel during the Obama Administration to extract massive settlements out of the banks, often over immaterial errors.

“[Banks] were in before and obviously they were in because it was beneficial to them,” Carson told HousingWire about banks’ presence in FHA lending.

“And then the housing crisis occurred and all of the sudden, the False Claims Act became a monster that started chasing everybody around the room, making their lives miserable, causing them an inordinate amount of pain,” Carson continued. “So they got out. But now, the monster has been slayed.”

Since 2010, the banking share of FHA origination has fallen from about 50% to 15%, and FHFA lays the blame at the feet of the False Claims Act. The DOJ will have its footprint in the enforcement process reduced, getting involved only when the Mortgagee Review Board deems it necessary.

 

Home Prices rose 0.3% MOM and 3.2% YOY in August, according to the Case Shiller Home Price Index. The hottest markets (San Francisco, Denver, and Seattle) are cooling off, and San Fran was down on a monthly and annual basis. The leading market was Phoenix.

 

The FOMC decision will come out tomorrow, and it looks like market participants will be taking a close look at the language for signs of a pause. If the rate cuts were merely an insurance policy to maintain the expansion, then they probably should take a break and see how the economy develops.

Morning Report: Existing home sales fall as prices increase

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2992 -2.25
Oil (WTI) 53.87 -0.64
10 year government bond yield 1.74%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.03%

 

Stocks are flattish as earnings come in. We should be hearing from heavyweights such as Tesla, Boeing, Caterpillar, Ford and Microsoft. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

Mortgage Applications fell 12% last week as purchases fell 4% and refis fell 17%. Mortgage rates increased 10 basis points and increased to 4.02%. “Interest rates continue to be volatile, with Brexit votes and ongoing trade negotiations swinging rates higher or lower on any given day,” said MBA Chief Economist Mike Fratantoni. “Last week, mortgage rates jumped 10 basis points and were above 4 percent for the first time since September. The increase in mortgage rates caused refinance applications to drop 17 percent, and by more than 20 percent for conventional loans. Borrowers with larger loans are the most sensitive to rate changes, and with rates climbing higher last week, the average size of a refinance loan application fell to its lowest level this year.”

 

Existing home sales fell 2.2% in September, according to NAR. Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said that despite historically low mortgage rates, sales have not commensurately increased, in part due to a low level of new housing options. “We must continue to beat the drum for more inventory,” said Yun, who has called for additional home construction for over a year. “Home prices are rising too rapidly because of the housing shortage, and this lack of inventory is preventing home sales growth potential.” The median home price increased 5.9% to 272,100 and the supply of available homes came in at 1.83 million units, or about 4 month’s worth of inventory.

 

Home prices rose 0.2% MOM and 4.6% YOY in August, according to the FHFA House Price Index. Home price appreciation is definitely decelerating this year, compared to 2018, although lower rates will probably re-accelerate growth in the markets with tighter inventory.

 

FHFA regional

 

FHFA Director Mark Calabria said that he is willing to wipe out the shareholders of Fannie and Freddie if needed to protect taxpayers. “If the circumstances present themselves where we have to wipe out the shareholders, we will.,” he said at testimony in front of the House Financial Services Committee. He added that he believes that shareholders should have lost their stakes in the GSEs when the government rescued them in 2008. Fannie and Fred were put into conservatorship, with the government owning 79.9% of the companies. This was done largely to prevent disruption to the mortgage market if the companies were to enter formal bankruptcy, and also to prevent the government from having to consolidate all of Fannie’s debt on its own balance sheet. His comments at least leaves the door open for some recovery value for common stockholders if the GSEs are reformed. FWIW, the Obama administration was absolutely steadfast in their belief that the stock was worthless, and a change in administrations will probably return to that stance.

 

 

Morning Report: New Home purchase activity up 33%

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2995.5 -6.25
Oil (WTI) 62.07 -0.84
10 year government bond yield 1.83%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.03%

 

Stocks are lower this morning as the markets continue to digest the Saudi oil situation. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

The FOMC begins its two day meeting today. The Fed funds futures further discounted the chance of a rate cut announcement tomorrow to 63% from 73% a day earlier.

 

Industrial Production rose 0.6% in August, and manufacturing production rose 0.5%. Both estimates were well in excess of street expectations. Capacity utilization rose to 77.9%. Pretty healthy numbers, and certainly don’t demonstrate that trade wars are killing the manufacturing economy.

 

New home purchase activity was up 33% on a YOY basis in August. “New home purchase activity was robust in August, as both mortgage applications and estimated home sales increased from a year ago,” said Joel Kan, MBA Associate Vice President of Economic and Industry Forecasting. “Recent increases in new residential housing permits and housing starts, lower mortgage rates, and a still-strong job market all bode well for the new home sales outlook.” This is a bullish sign for the economy, as we have underbuilt for years. New Home Sales has been in the 600k – 700k range recently, which is at levels last seen in the mid 90s.

 

new home sales

 

That said, the population has grown, so mid-90s levels doesn’t really support the demand out there. Adjusting for population, the historical average would equate to about 900k new homes sold, or about 30% higher than here.

 

FHFA Director Mark Calabria was interviewed on Bloomberg TV on the GSEs. It looks like they will hit the market to raise capital by the end of 2020. The first order of business is to end the net worth sweep, which will allow them to build capital. FHFA and Treasury haven’t settled on a number for the capital increase yet. Fannie Mae stock was up a touch on the interview.

Morning Report: Surprisingly strong GDP report

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2939 -3.25
Eurostoxx index 390.26 -0.72
Oil (WTI) 63.11 -0.18
10 year government bond yield 2.51%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.23%

 

Stocks are flattish as we end the month of April. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

We have a decent amount of data this week, along with a Fed meeting. The biggest news will be the jobs report on Friday, although we will get income / spending data and the ISM.

 

Q1 GDP came in at a much higher than expected 3.2% versus the 2.3% growth that was expected. Even better, the inflation rate came in much lower than expected, which should mean the Fed is out of the way. The 10 year bond yield traded below 2.5% for the first time in 2 months, despite having the strongest Q1 growth in 4 years. Note that consumption didn’t drive the increase in growth (it only came in at 1.2%) – the growth was driven by exports  – which at a minimum should end the talking point that Trump’s trade wars are alienating our trading partners.

 

GDP

 

The immediate market reaction was subdued. The 10 year bond yield drifted lower, stocks were flat, and the Fed Funds futures didn’t change all that much – still predicting a 1/3 chance of no moves this year and a 2/3 chance of a rate cut.

 

In terms of the individual components, the trade numbers were affected by both an increase in exports (3.7%) and a drop in imports (-3.7%). Durable goods consumption fell 5.3%, which is probably related. Residential continues to be a persistent weak spot (-2.8%), and a bit of a head-scratcher given the sheer lack of inventory. Increased investment was driven by an increase in intellectual property (8.6%), which offset a decrease in building (-0.8%).

 

Housing’s contribution to GDP has been shrinking since the late 80s. The financial crisis caused it to fall from about 18% to 15%, and in the past decade it has been more or less stuck there. It looks like housing is again beginning to decline as a percent of GDP, and it is now below 15%. If housing can get back to at least normalcy, that should provide a good bump for GDP growth.

 

housing GDP

 

Personal Incomes rose 0.1% in March, which was below expectations. Consumption surprised to the upside. Inflation remains tame, with the headline PCE number up .1% MOM / 1.5% YOY and the core up 0.2% / 1.6% YOY.

 

New FHFA Director Mark Calabria has an ambitious agenda for housing reform, including solving problems with servicing, fixing the QM patch, and eventually releasing the GSEs from conservatorship. He is emphatic that he does not want to see the mortgage market return to the pre-2008 days.

Morning Report: Home price appreciation is slowing

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2910.5 -2
Eurostoxx index 389.7 -0.8
Oil (WTI) 65.66 1.29
10 year government bond yield 2.59%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.34%

 

Stocks are flattish this morning as we await earnings from some of the FAANG heavyweights. Bonds and MBS are flat as well.

 

Existing home sales fell 4.9% in March to a seasonally adjusted annualized level of 5.21 million. A decrease was expected since February’s numbers were stronger than expected. On a year-over-year basis, sales are down 5.4%. The median home price rose 3.8% to $254,400, and it looks like home price appreciation is slowing down here as well. Inventory remains the problem, with 1.68 million homes for sale, representing a 3.9 month supply. A balanced market would be closer to 2.6 million homes for sale. In addition, we have a glut at the luxury price points and a shortage at the entry-level price points. Days on market increased YOY to 36 from 30. First time homebuyers represented a third of all transactions. Historically that number has been closer to 40%.

 

Home prices rose 0.3% MOM in February and are up 4.9% YOY, according to the FHFA House Price Index. Note the difference in price appreciation versus the NAR numbers (+4.9% versus +3.8%) – this reflects the fact that the FHFA index excludes jumbos, which is where there real slowdown is being seen, especially in high tax states.  Take a look at the YOY price appreciation comparison regionally and check out the difference between this time last year in home price appreciation on the West Coast.

 

FHFA regional

 

Herman Cain has withdrawn his name from consideration to the Fed. A handful of Republican senators expressed reservations about his nomination, which was probably enough to make his actual confirmation unlikely. The top Democrat in the U.S. Senate, Chuck Schumer, said Cain’s “failure to garner adequate support should not be used as a pathway by Senate Republicans to approve Stephen Moore, who is equally unqualified, and perhaps more political.”

 

The Trump Administration is taking a look at downpayment assistance programs – generally government programs that help borrowers put together their 3.5% down payment for a FHA loan. As you would expect, borrowers who need help scraping together 3.5% are riskier, and indeed the default rates on these mortgages are double those of a traditional FHA mortgage (and FHA DQs are much higher than conventional DQs). HUD promulgated new guidance for downpayment assistance programs last week tightening documentation rules. Ballard Spahr summarizes the new guidance here.

Morning Report: Rebound in refinances this year

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2917.25 5.85
Eurostoxx index 388.92 -0.35
Oil (WTI) 64.39 0.34
10 year government bond yield 2.61%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.32%

 

Stocks are higher this morning as bank earnings continue to come in. Bonds and MBS are down on stronger-than-expected data out of China.

 

Mortgage Applications fell 3.5% last week as purchases rose 1% and refis fell 8%. “Mortgage applications decreased over the week, driven by a decline in refinances,” said Joel Kan, MBA Associate Vice President of Economic and Industry Forecasting. “With mortgage rates up for the second week in a row, it’s no surprise that refinancings slid 8 percent and average loan sizes dropped back closer to normal levels.” The average mortgage rate rose 4 basis points to 4.44%. The refinance index has rebounded smartly over the past several months, but we are nowhere near the levels of the 2015 refi boom, let alone the 2011-2012 boom.

 

refi index

 

Builder optimism inched up as the the NAHB / Wells Fargo Housing Market index rose 1 point to 63. As has been the case throughout the recovery, the West led the pack, with the Midwest and Northeast picking up the rear. “Builders report solid demand for new single-family homes but they are also grappling with affordability concerns stemming from a chronic shortage of construction workers and buildable lots,” said NAHB Chairman Greg Ugalde.

 

Industrial Production slipped 0.1% in March, while manufacturing production was flat. Capacity Utilization dropped .2% to 68.8%. This was generally a disappointing report, however orders for business equipment and capital expenditures bounced back after a deep decline in February. Over the past several years, the first quarter has been weak, and it looks like this year is more of the same.

 

New FHFA Chairman Mark Calabria said he takes the role with a “great sense of urgency” with regard to reforming Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. He was confirmed as FHFA Chairman last week on a straight party line vote. “The mortgage market was at the center of the last crisis, as it has been for many past financial crises,” Federal Housing Finance Agency Director Mark Calabria said Monday in his first official remarks as head of the agency. “I believe the foundations of our current mortgage finance system remain vulnerable.”