Morning Report: Big week ahead

Vital Statistics:

Last Change
S&P futures 2782 -0.5
Eurostoxx index 386.55 1.43
Oil (WTI) 65.12 -0.61
10 Year Government Bond Yield 2.96%
30 Year fixed rate mortgage 4.59%

Stocks are flattish this morning ahead of a busy week. Bonds and MBS are down small.

This is a big week with the FOMC meeting on Tuesday and Wednesday, the ECB, and also a slew of economic data, particularly inflation data. The FOMC meeting will dominate, and we will also get a fresh new set of projections. The Street will focus on the inflation projections, especially as we continue to get anecdotal evidence of wage inflation.

The G7 met over the weekend, and it largely consisted of Donald Trump playing Al Czervik to the Bushwood global elite. There is talk about us doing permanent damage to our allies, but these events are largely messaging affairs and nothing much concrete ever comes out of them. There were a bunch of threats and counter-threats over trade barriers, and the message from the Administration was that the US has historically accepted the short end of the stick on these trade deals in the name of free trade in general, but those days are over. Will anything actually come from this? Probably not, which is why the markets don’t care.

Trump left the G7 meeting early to head to the Singapore Summit to meet with Kim Jong Un.

CFPB Director Mick Mulvaney said on Friday that he fired the 3 advisory boards because they were simply too big. He said that many participants were uncomfortable being candid at these meetings, and that “There is actually some good information that can pass when you sort of turn the cameras off.” Mulvaney has also been frustrated by leaks coming out of the agency, and he hopes this will help. Mulvaney also intends for the CFPB to go out “in the field” and have more town hall discussion meetings.

The interest rate on excess reserves is a real “inside baseball” statistic that could hold some clues on how the Fed intends to proceed going forward. The Fed is worried that conditions are tightening in the money markets and there are less excess reserves (excess reserves in another name for “dry powder” in the banking system). If there is less dry powder (or lending capacity) in the system then borrowers will have to accept higher rates in order to access these funds. The Fed funds rate is already close to the high end of the target range, which is worrying the some on the FOMC. The Fed started unwinding its QE balance sheet, letting about $100 billion of its $4.5 trillion sheet run off. We are already seeing a swoon in emerging markets. Bottom line: tightening financial conditions could cause the Fed to take a breather sooner than anticipated.

Fed assets

Rising interest rates and home prices are not deterring potential home purchasers, as the Fannie Mae Home Purchase Sentiment Index hit a new high in May. “The HPSI edged up to another survey high in May, bolstered in part by a fresh record high in the net share of consumers who say it’s a good time to sell a home. However, the perception of high home prices that underlies this optimism cuts both ways, boosting not only the good-time-to-sell sentiment but also the view that it’s a bad time to buy, and presenting a potential dilemma for repeat buyers,” said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae.