Morning Report: Fannie Mae surges on housing reform

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2973.5 -5.25
Oil (WTI) 58.46 0.44
10 year government bond yield 1.64
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.77%

 

Stocks are lower this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

Steve Mnuchin is scheduled to testify before the Senate Banking Committee this morning regarding housing reform and the role of Fannie and Freddie. Mark Calabria, who runs the FHFA and Ben Carson who runs HUD will also join him. Note that Fannie and Freddie surged 35% yesterday on a Compass Point piece that expressed optimism for a shareholder suit and Mnuchin said that they were closer to retaining their earnings. You might want to keep an eye on the screen this morning if you hold these stocks.

 

Fannie mae stock

 

Small Business Optimism fell in August as respondents tempered their optimism about the future. Much of this was due to the about-face at the Fed, and fears that they might know something everyone else does not. Despite the drop in expectations, the small business labor market improved, with firms hiring .19 workers on average, and many finding it difficult to hire qualified workers. Small business also increased capital spending, which indicates optimism about the future. So, despite the dip in optimism, firms are still spending like the expansion will continue. One other data point: credit availability remains a non-problem. Only 4% of small businesses reported that their borrowing needs were not met, which is more or less a historical record. So, don’t expect much additional juice from rate cuts, as there is already more than enough credit.

 

The Chinese government removed the foreign cap on investments, although this is largely a symbolic move, as the current limit presents no constraint. That said, it is hard to avoid the thought that the Chinese government is looking for some greater fools out there for their banking system to sell assets to. Despite the talk about the yuan becoming a reserve currency, the Chinese government probably won’t want to give up the amount of control required.

 

Delinquency rates continue to fall, according to CoreLogic. The 30 day delinquency rate fell 30 basis points to 4% in June. The foreclosure rate fell 10 bps to 0.4%. We did see an uptick in a few states that wasn’t natural disaster related: VT, NH, MN, and ND.

 

Corelogic delinquencies.

 

 

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Morning Report: No changes to GDP

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2926.25 8.25
Oil (WTI) 59.03 -.35
10 year government bond yield 2.02%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.02%

 

Stocks are higher this morning on news that the US and China will resume trade talks over the weekend. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

The third revision to first quarter GDP was unchanged, coming in at 3.1%. Inflation was revised upward ever so slightly, from a core PCE rate of 1% to 1.2%. At this stage of the game, the markets are going to focus on weak economic data, not inflation data. Note the Atlanta Fed is forecasting that second quarter GDP will come in at 1.9%.

 

Initial Jobless Claims remain low, rising slightly to 227,000.

 

Donald Trump continues to criticize Fed Chairman Jerome Powell, even going as far as to tweet that ECB President Mario Draghi is better. While it is unlikely Trump would try and fire Powell (or demote him), the legal principle of Fed independence will probably make that difficult.

 

The VA will now guarantee loans that exceed the conforming loan limit. Veterans will be able to borrow above the $484,350 limit without any down payment. This impetus for this decision was to raise money for veterans who have health issues after being exposed to Agent Orange. The initial idea was to raise the VA loan fee by 15 basis points, however lawmakers decided to raise the funds by increasing the cap.

 

A new report by Barclay’s and Annaly Mortgage lays out a post-conservatorship world for the US residential real estate finance market. Lawmakers generally agree on the goals of housing reform: protect the US taxpayer, attract private capital, and create a more competitive landscape. Getting there is going to be more difficult as Democrats and Republicans have different priorities. The report looks at things the Administration could do unilaterally via executive order. The first would involve FHFA ordering the GSEs out of non-core markets, such as second homes, jumbo and investor loans. The second would involve the creation of a revolving credit risk transfer facility. A third would involve removing the “GSE patch” which allows Fannie and Fred to originate QM loans at DTI levels private lenders cannot. Finally, there is work that needs to be done at the SEC / SIFMA level that concerns private label securitizations. Ultimately the issue of what to be done with GSEs will have to be solved legislatively. Either they become converted to Federal Government utilities or they become privatized. The privatization route envisions breaking up the duopoly into much smaller guarantors.

Morning Report: Final estimate for fourth quarter GDP

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2811.75 1.25
Eurostoxx index 375.78 -1.45
Oil (WTI) 59.49 -0.45
10 year government bond yield 2.38%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.08%

 

Stocks are flattish this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are flat.

 

Fourth quarter GDP was revised downward to 2.2% in the third and final estimate. Inflation came in at 1.5%. This is more ammo for the Fed to possibly cut rates this year.

 

GDP

 

Initial Jobless Claims came in at 211k last week. Despite the slowdown in economic activity, employers are hanging on to their workers. Speaking of labor, McDonalds will no longer lobby against minimum wage hikes. It probably is safe for McDonalds – their franchisees bear the brunt of labor costs not corporate. At any rate, I’m not sure that Republicans really need a lobbyist to tell them to oppose minimum wage hikes, but companies seem more interested in placating the social justice mob these days than delivering shareholder returns.

 

Facebook has been charged with housing discrimination based on algorithms that target housing-related ads. “Facebook is discriminating against people based upon who they are and where they live,” HUD Secretary Ben Carson said in a statement announcing the charges of violating the Fair Housing Act. “Using a computer to limit a person’s housing choices can be just as discriminatory as slamming a door in someone’s face.”

 

The White House has released a memorandum on housing reform. There were no discernible policy changes in it – the government would like to decrease the GSE’s footprint in the mortgage market while maintain the 30 year fixed rate mortgage and affordable housing goals. They did mention the goal of getting more banks doing FHA loans, although the capital treatment of servicing rights probably makes that tough. Fannie Mae stock liked the release, rallying 9%.

 

The Washington Post has run something like 4 anti Steven Moore editorials in the past few days. The economics establishment really doesn’t like the nomination. Don’t forget one thing, though. While it is generally not a good thing when politicians criticize monetary policy (and Trump / Moore were pretty outspoken about it), the action in the Fed Funds futures and the change in the dot plot shows they were right.

Morning Report: Initial Jobless Claims break 200,000

Initial Jobless Claims broke 200k, falling to 199k last week. This is the lowest level since the 1960s. For all of those fretting over a possible economic slowdown, we aren’t seeing any evidence of that in the initial jobless claims numbers. These numbers are impressive enough in of themselves, however if you correct for population growth, we are in pretty much uncharted territory.

 

initial jobless claims divided by population

 

The Index of Leading Economic Indicators fell 0.1% in December, according to the Conference Board. This follows a 0.2% increase in November. “The US LEI declined slightly in December and the recent moderation in the LEI suggests that the US economic
growth rate may slow down this year,” said Ataman Ozyildirim, Director of Economic Research at The Conference Board. “While the effects of the government shutdown are not yet reflected here, the LEI suggests that the economy could decelerate towards 2 percent growth by the end of 2019.”

 

Adjustable rate mortgage are making a comeback, at least according to the latest Ellie Mae Origination Insight Report. ARMs accounted for 9.2% of all originations in December, up from 8.8% in November. Purchases accounted for 71% of all originations, and other indicators like FICO, DTIs, and cycle times were largely unchanged.

 

Dueling bills to re-open government failed in the Senate yesterday. Talks have resumed between the parties to find a compromise everyone can live with.

 

The Fed is contemplating an earlier end to the tapering process than the market has been anticipating. The Fed’s balance sheet pre-crisis was about $800 billion. It peaked around $4.5 trillion and has fallen to something like $4.1 trillion since they began letting some of the portfolio run off (i.e letting bonds mature and not re-investing the proceeds). The market thought the Fed would likely return to pre-crisis levels, however the consensus is that probably won’t happen as it could create issues with banking reserves. What does that mean for the mortgage industry? At least for the moment it means that there will be more incremental demand for TBAs from the Fed, which will mean lower rates, at least at the margin.

 

Housing reform may be a front-burner issue again, as lawmakers pledge to do something with Fan and Fred.