Morning Report: 35% of the top 100 metros are overvalued

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2821 26
Oil (WTI) 61.65 0.61
10 year government bond yield 2.42%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.17%

 

Stocks are higher this morning as overseas stocks rebound. Bonds and MBS are down.

 

Small Business Optimism increased in April, according to the NFIB. Pretty much every component of the index increased, with only capital expenditure plans unchanged from March. “The ‘real’ economy is doing very well versus what we see in financial market volatility. Many jobs were created, and GDP produced with no substantive inflation pressure. The pace of economic growth has accelerated, and consumers and small businesses are an important part of the improvement in sales,” said NFIB’s Chief Economist Bill Dunkelberg.

 

What will global warming do to Florida real estate values? According to one environmentalist, lending for 30 year for Florida property is insane. “No one should be lending for 30 years in most of Florida,” [Woods Hole senior fellow Spencer Glendon] said at an investment conference in New York last week. “During that time frame, insurance will disappear and terminal values” — future resale income — “will shrink. I tell my parents that it’s fine to rent in Florida, but it’s insane to own or to lend.” Note that the US flood insurance is heavily subsidized and will probably have to be cut back if the more extreme forecasts end up being borne out.

 

Stocks had a bit of a rebound yesterday after Steve Mnuchin assured that the trade talks with China are still ongoing. Uber had another rough day, with the stock closing at $37.10 a share, down 18% from the IPO price on Friday.

 

30 day DQs are down 80 basis points from 4.8% to 4% according to CoreLogic. DQs fell in every bucket, and the foreclosure rate fell from 0.6% to 0.4%. Separately, home prices rose 3.7% YOY in February. 35% of cities have overvalued housing stock, while 26% are undervalued and 39% are fairly valued.

 

Corelogic overvalued

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Morning Report: Consumer inflation remains muted

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 2787 2
Eurostoxx index 372.85 -1
Oil (WTI) 57.27 0.47
10 year government bond yield 2.65%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 4.32%

 

Stocks are higher with a general “risk-on” feel to the tape. Bonds and MBS are down.

 

Lael Brainard speaks this morning and then the Fed enters its quiet period ahead of next week’s FOMC meeting.

 

Consumer inflation rose 0.4% MOM in February. Ex-food and energy, the index rose 0.4% and is up 2.1% YOY. Inflation remains under control, which should give the Fed the leeway to hold the line on rates next week. Falling energy prices at the end of 2018 helped keep the index under control, and we are seeing evidence that medical costs are finally stabilizing. Medical goods fell 1% MOM and services were flat. Stabilizing medical costs should translate into stable health insurance costs, which leaves more room for wage increases.

 

medical cpi

 

Retail Sales in January rose 0.2%, a touch higher than expectations. Those looking for a big rebound after December’s anemic numbers were disappointed. Given the strong consumption numbers in Q4 GDP, the holiday shopping season remains a bit of a mystery. The government shutdown is a possible explanation, and while it certainly hit the shops at Tyson’s Corner, the rest of the nation was unaffected. Note that the Fed’s consumer credit report showed that revolving credit increased only 1.1% in December and 2.9% in January, both well below run rates we have seen in the months leading up to it

 

Nancy Pelosi doesn’t support impeaching Trump. This is probably a tacit admission that the Mueller report isn’t going to contain anything we don’t already know.

 

Small business optimism rebounded in February. Earnings trends fell as many contractors were temporarily sidelined due to the government shutdown. Employment trends also slipped, probably for the same reason. Plans for expansion rose, however they are still below levels we saw in 2017-2018, which were extremely strong. Actual hires were the highest in years, and small business still finds a shortage of qualified workers. I am curious as to whether the “shortage of qualified workers” means (a) nobody around knows how to do the job, (b) nobody around knows how to do the job and can pass a drug test, or (c) nobody around that knows how to do the job will accept what I am willing to pay.